2001: A Space Odyssey the Second Time Around

How my appreciation of the film has grown upon viewing it a second time.

A little more than a year ago I had the chance to see 2001: A Space Odyssey for the first time. Lucky for me, it was in a theater and in 70mm. I was blown away by the film. Last night I got to see 2001 for the second time. It was in a theater with a 35mm print.

I didn’t expect this happen, but the film was even better the second time around. A year was the perfect time between seeing the movie again.

Knowing where the plot goes and the key scenes allowed me to instead focus on the small details of the film. The music. The visuals. The camera movement. The pacing. The special effects. They’re all superb. I have a new appreciation for 2001: A Space Odyssey, and it’s even more cemented in my mind as one of the all-time great films.

In the world of modern cinema with rapid cuts, overused CGI, and no silence, 2001: A Space Odyssey was breath of fresh air.

Dune Review

My thoughts on David Lynch’s 1984 film Dune.

Where are my feelings?

Dune is among the worst films I’ve seen.  It’s disappointing because it’s written and directed by my favorite director. It doesn’t work on any level, especially when compared to contempary sci-fi films. The story is illogical, the character development is nonexistent, the special effects have aged very poorly, and the dialogue is often laugh out loud cheesy. 

Also, Patrick Stewart’s mullet. I can’t even. 

Going in without having read the book and hearing pretty divided opinions on the film, I tried to stay open minded. Woof, a bit of a let down. 

Honestly, the best part was the pug.

Dune - Kyle - Pug
Dune - Family Pug
Dune - Patrick Stewart - Pug

Dunkirk Review

Why Christopher Nolan’s 2017 war thriller didn’t work for me.

I feel like I need a weekend at the spa after seeing Dunkirk. It’s certainly impressive, but it’s too intense for its own good. The nonlinear editing was a strange choice, and the dialogue was mostly impossible for me to understand (bad mix or bad speakers?). 

The raw carnage of the events at Dunkirk hit hard, more so than any of the characters the film invents. It’s still difficult to believe that less than a century ago the world was at war for the second time. It, at times, almost feels fictional with the current state of things. The visuals displayed in the film felt real, which is what I find most impressive.

I keep drawing comparisons between Dunkirk and Mad Max: Fury Road. Not because they both feature Tom Hardy not talking much. But because they are both non-stop intense action thrillers. Fury Road, for me, succeeds on a higher artistic level. Even though neither slow down much, Fury Road strikes a better balance for the intensity. 

To me, Dunkirk is a lesson in intensity. I appreciate quiet films and the quiet moments in loud films. It’s very hard for me to enjoy a movie where there’s a stopwatch ticking almost the whole time. It felt like I was being manipulated over and over with each scene in a way that was upsetting at a deeper level than most manipulation in film.

I didn’t enjoy Dunkirk, but I appreciate that it exists and that I got to see it in 70mm.

All the Great Scenes: The Thread Will Be Torn, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

David Lynch is the master of intensity, and this scene proves it.

There was a stillness.

The sound design in this scene totally makes it. And Ray Wise’s performance as Leland Palmer is brilliant. I think he’s one of the great underrated actors.

Also, Lynch’s seeming obsession with the elderly walking slowly never gets old.