The Official English Language Association’s List of Banned Words & Phrases (2017 Edition)

The ELA’s latest edition of our Banned Words & Phrases (BWAP).

The English Language Association (ELA) is proud (and slightly nervous) to share our official list of banned words and phrases of 2017.

The following words and phrases are subject to a five year ban. Any offenses reported to the ELA will result in a $30 fine. Starting today, please refrain from using the following words and phrases. Thank you for understanding.

“Literally”

I literally can’t believe you’re banning this word, what the heck?

We get it, we really do. You meant what you said. We didn’t doubt it to begin with.

“Privilege”

Check your privilege ELA! You were born with a silver pen in your mouth!

While we at the ELA believe discussing the advantages one may have is important, the word has exceeded its allotted uses and has subsequently lost its meaning.

“Millennial”

You won’t believe the 10 things this Millennial said to me when he punched me for referring to him as a Millennial.

Just wait until the Great Millennial uprising. You’ll have wished you stopped writing click-bait articles about us.

“Like”

But you can’t, like, tell me what to say. First Amendment!

We’ve been fighting this one for almost two decades, and it’s only gotten worse. We may be doomed as a society.

“Hey, guys”

Hey, guys. We don’t need no ELA. Language is descriptive, not prescriptive.

Even if there are only male identifying people in the group you are addressing, just stop. Practice makes perfect, y’all.

“Part the kimono”

Let’s part the kimono and really find out who’s behind this English Language Association.

A serious contender for the creepiest phrase that has entered the lexicon in the last century.

“Politically correct (PC)”

This whole list is just so PC.

It has nothing to do with politics and correctness. It has to do with being thoughtful of and respectful to others. Words have meaning.


Please send any and all feedback to feedback@englishlanguageassociation.org. We’ll get back to you in no fewer than 48 business years.

Author: Brett Chalupa

day: software developer, night: comic artist

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